Lawyer in porn case pushes discrimination against veterans

Last week, the New Jersey Herald ran a story about a drug offender who is suing the Sussex County Sheriff's Office and the County over its hiring practices.  In the story, the attorney for the drug offender calls into question the hiring of veterans.

The attorney told the Herald, "You can't just hand a combat veteran a badge and a gun."  The attorney explained that while he "fully supports the hiring of veterans," his lawsuit is focusing on "the interview process" and "psychological profile." 

Wow!  Here in New Jersey, the Democrat-controlled Legislature recently made it very difficult for a business to refuse to hire someone with a criminal record.  The idea was that having done his or her time, an employer did not have the right to make a determination to hire someone based on his or her past criminal actions. 

An employer can't discriminate against a convicted criminal but the suggestion is being made by this attorney that having served in the military in a combat role should be a red flag for certain kinds of employment.  In other words -- it's okay to go to Iraq but not okay to come back home and expect to be hired as a local police officer or deputy sheriff.  Putting your life on the line in service to our nation makes you a "special case."

The attorney making this ridiculous argument is a former county politician.  A few years ago he got caught up in a State Police operation that shut down a child porn ring.  Police arrested 36 people in New Jersey and claimed in newspaper headlines that the suspects had sought the video in question. 

For whatever reason -- his status as a member of the bar, his political contacts, or the facts of the case -- the attorney who is now advocating that military combat veterans undergo special scrutiny got himself a very good deal.  According to news reports in the Herald and elsewhere, he avoided trial and was granted PTI (pre-trial intervention) on the charges.  The State Attorney General's office declined to appeal a State Superior Court judge's ruling to allow PTI in this case.  PTI is a probationary program that is generally used for low-level offenders.  When successfully completed, the criminal charges are removed from a person's record.  In the case of this attorney, we understand that the those charges have been removed, although a public record -- the extensive media coverage of this case -- remains. 

According to the Heraldthe Deputy Attorney General prosecuting the case "would not say why the state's Office of Attorney General decided to not challenge the ruling."

Given the very understanding treatment that this attorney received by the state, we would suggest that he extend the same consideration to those whose only apparent fault is being placed in harm's way by their government, dutifully engaging in combat on behalf of the American people, honorably serving, surviving, and then returning home.  Don't make it more difficult for them to find employment.  Don't turn them into a pariah, suspect class of job seekers.